Numbers Rings Madness: 10, 11, and 12 Rings

So recently, Junming Lin posted the following video of him doing a 12 ring flash.

Crazy, right? As you can see, part of the challenge is just launching that many rings to begin with. My biggest stumbling block in trying to learn 7 is that I’m finding it very difficult to cleanly release 4 rings from one hand. As you can see in the video, Junming approaches this by starting with 4 in each hand, then 2 in hip holsters at his sides, and 2 in his mouth. His pattern is synchronous, meaning that he is throwing from both hands at the same time.

Shortly afterwards, Pavel Evsukevich released this video. Pavel is one of my favorite jugglers to watch these days, and also happens to be an incredibly nice guy. I met him and got to spend some time with him at the 2012 IJA Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Pavel is choosing to launch 5 from each hand, with 2 rings in hip holsters to start. But he also demonstrates a 10 ring qualify, 10 rings with a balance, 13 catches of 11 rings, and perhaps most incredibly an 11 ring flash with a ring head balance. You’ll also notice Pavel does all of these asynchronously, meaning his hands throw out of synch with each other. Not necessarily better or worse, but different.

Ryan Mellors: Using Motion to Spice Up Your Act

This video by Ryan Mellors is a great example of how you take what could have been a relatively standard juggling video, and by adding movement and style you turn it into something much more. If you study dance or gymnastics, think about how you could incorporate it into your juggling to make your juggling more interesting. If you don’t, but you enjoy juggling, think about whether dance might give you a whole new perspective on things.

Slight language warning: I noticed at least one inappropriate word in the soundtrack to this video, and I usually try to steer clear of such things when sharing videos with students. In this case I decided not to let that stop me from sharing an otherwise really interesting video. Just be forewarned.

Juggling with Hands and Feet

Today in class, someone asked me if it was possible to juggle using both your hands and feet. In general these days, when the question is, “Is it possible to juggle like ?”, the answer is usually yes. In this case, it definitely is, and I mentioned two jugglers I’ve seen personally who are incredible in this area. The two I mentioned were:

Peter Irish

And Jorden Moir

(That second video behaved sort of strangely for me; hopefully it works better for you)

Alexis Levillon changes the diabolo game

My juggling friends know that for the most part I’m not a huge diabolo guy. But I like to think I can appreciate when I see someone doing amazing diabolo work. It wasn’t that long ago I first saw someone doing multiple diabolos in vertax (where the axis of the diabolo is vertical rather than horizontal). Now, here we have Alexis Levillon taking this a step further: doing multiple diabolos while one is in vertax and another isn’t. I would have thought physics would have had something to say about that. Apparently not. Good stuff.

Emil Dahl: 9 club flash on video!

Well, that was a surprise.

7 clubs is the usual “top of Mount Everest” for club numbers juggling. By now quite a few people can do it, and the very best can do it for minutes. A handful of jugglers have dabbled with 8, and have claimed to at least have flashed it. Anthony Gatto has qualified 8; you can see it in this video:

This summer, I heard from friends at Juggle This! in NYC that Emil Dahl was looking pretty good with 8 clubs, and making real progress. So then I wake up this morning to this:

Part of the craziness here is releasing and collecting 5 clubs from one hand. Quite humbling when my collect of 5 clubs is still so bad with 2 hands.

FDB97531 – First time I’ve seen one

And perhaps the first time it has ever been done? This is the 8 ball version of the “tower series” of siteswaps. In these tricks, each throw goes lower than the previous one, so that the balls all land in the reverse order they were thrown. The 3 ball version, 531, is a pretty reasonable trick to learn early on – if you take lessons with me, I’d be happy to help you with it sometime. I’m getting close to my first 97531 (the 5 ball version), but haven’t quite landed it yet. You can see Alex do a few DB97531 in this video as well. Enjoy!

 

Wes Peden Show Extracts

Wes is one of the most popular jugglers performing today, and this video will give you an idea why. Aside from being an outstanding technical juggler, his acts are full of so much creativity. I’ve watched him perform with non-jugglers, and had them ask me, “What is that he just did?”, and the answer is usually, “I have no idea. Nobody really does. That doesn’t have a name; that’s just Wes doing his thing.” Watch how he makes use of the entire stage, incorporates body movement, has a wide variety of throws and catches, moves between props, mixes props, etc. etc. I think this was filmed at the 2012 St. Louis festival, where I first saw him perform live.

Kyle Driggs: 2013 IJA Individuals Champion

I was backstage for the 2013 championships, and this routine completely floored me. I was familiar with a few of the incredible acts that were competing, and I wasn’t familiar with Kyle going into the competition. I sure am now. This routine emphasized a point I’d been realizing for some time: circus school really matters. I know many jugglers who have not attended circus school, and some who have. While I know great jugglers of both kinds, those that did generally put together much better routines, whether or not the juggling itself is better. The choreography, the mood, the theme… just beautiful.